Tag Archives: Animation

Gandalf and "Aruman" in the Ralph Bakshi cartoon.

Live Tweeting at Noon on Saturday

Gandalf and "Aruman" in the Ralph Bakshi cartoon.As I said in my last post, I am going to be live-tweeting my thoughts on Ralph Bakshi’s adaptation of The Lord of the Rings on Saturday the 14th at #lotr78.  The live-tweeting will take place at 12:00PM Pacific Time, so make a note in your schedule if you’re interested.  Also, to make sure you don’t miss it, you can follow me at @HM_Turnbull.

I look forward to sharing my thoughts on this movie with you!  Expect more updates soon.

Frodo and Gandalf in Ralph Bakshi's rotoscoped cartoon.

Live Tweeting Bakshi’s “The Lord of the Rings“ Next Week

In September I live-tweeted my thoughts on the Rankin/Bass adaptation of The Hobbit.Frodo and Gandalf in Ralph Bakshi's rotoscoped cartoon.  In October I posted my full review, and on no other article have I ever worked harder.  I’ve said before that I will do the same with the rest of the makeshift cartoon trilogy—first Ralph Bakshi’s adaptation of the first half of The Lord of the Rings, then Rankin/Bass’s attempt at the final third: The Return of the King.  I’ve got another review scheduled for the tenth, and then next Saturday I’m going to watch Bakshi’s “The Lord of the Rings” and live-tweet my thoughts at #lotr78.

I apologize that I don’t have an exact time of day planned yet, but I’ll post an update on my website and all relevant social-media when I know more.  To make sure you don’t miss the live-tweeting, you can follow me on Twitter at @HM_Turnbull.

“The Twelve Kingdoms” Anime Review

I recently decided that, just for the fun of seeing what would happen, I’d randomly decide on an anime I’d never heard of and watch it from start to finish.  Unfortunately, it didn’t turn out as well as I had hoped.  I mean, I do have quite a lot to say about it, but the show itself wasn’t especially good.
Continue reading “The Twelve Kingdoms” Anime Review

The 1977 Hobbit cartoon is an abomination.

Review of Rankin/Bass’ The Hobbit (1977)

In the first article I ever wrote for this site, I reviewed a 1966 cartoon loosely derived from The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien.The 1977 Hobbit cartoon is an abomination.  Now, this cartoon was actually calculated to be as faithless an adaptation as possible for use as a tool of blackmail, and this eventually led to the existence of a second attempt to adapt The Hobbit to the screen eleven years later, this time by Rankin/Bass, a studio famous for its holiday specials.  Many of their other works are really good, but they’re really out of their league here.  This, along with two later cartoons, are often considered to make up a sort of half-formed trilogy, and I’ll eventually get around to reviewing the other two.
Continue reading Review of Rankin/Bass’ The Hobbit (1977)

King Bilbo imagery in the Rankin/Bass Hobbit cartoon

Progress on The Hobbit 1977 Review

Happy October to everyone who isn’t reviewing a bloody awful ’70s cartoon!  If you’ve been following me on Twitter, you might have heard that I didn’t get much sleep last night.  This is because the review I’m working on has been the most intense and time-consuming review I’ve written.  To make things worse, a street-lamp turned on outside my window just as I was ready to go to sleep.  I’ve been working almost non-stop on getting the review done as soon as possible so you can read my thoughts on that cartoon.  Luckily, I’ve gotten some better blinds for my window, and I expect I’ll have the article ready sometime in the next week.

In the meantime, please enjoy the highlights of my live-tweeting event…
Continue reading Progress on The Hobbit 1977 Review

Aang and Zuko fighting

Avatar: The Last Airbender, The Greatest Show of All Time

After I reviewed The Nutshack, one of the worst cartoons of all time, I said I’d talk about a good cartoon in my next review.  There are so many great cartoons that it’s taken me quite a long time to decide which of them I should discuss first.  My first thought was to talk about my favourite cartoon airing today, but reviewing that would require more context than I wanted to give in this article.  Therefore I decided to start by reviewing my favourite cartoon—my favourite show, in fact—of all time!
Continue reading Avatar: The Last Airbender, The Greatest Show of All Time

The hideous character design for Phil, the main character in The Nutshack.

The Nutshack Review

I hate this cartoon.  I hate it!  Let’s get that out of the way.  I knew I wouldn’t want to watch this more than once so I decided to write this review while watching this abomination of a cartoon.  If you’ve no aversion to profuse swearing, then you’re welcome to read the uncensored version.

It starts with a horrible rap theme that makes me want to slit my wrists.  I can’t distinguish the lyrics over the abhorrent instrumentation, but I can tell they’re bloody horrible!  I loathe this show!  I’ve only seen the title sequence, but I already hate everything to do with this show!  It just drones on, saying, “It’s the—nutshack!” over and over, punctuated by an insufferably high-pitched voice shouting “oh, yeah!” among other things.  Then it gets to the rap portion, and I generally can’t stand rap, but this takes it to a whole new low.  I can’t understand any of the lyrics other than “take—take a breavah—in my lungs—I got grapes…”  Screw this show.

Continue reading The Nutshack Review

The main cast of the horrible television show Brickleberry

Brickleberry: How Can Anyone Like This Show?

I’d heard this cartoon was bad.  I’d heard it was just another stupid adult cartoon trying to pander to the same audience as Allen Gregory, Mr. Pickles, or King Star King.  Having actually watched it, I can honestly say that Brickleberry makes Allen Gregory look like Rick and Morty in terms of quality!
Continue reading Brickleberry: How Can Anyone Like This Show?

Qui-Gon Jinn, a jedi who shouldn't exist, grabs the tongue of Jar Jar, who also shouldn't exist.

The True Horror of the Star Wars Prequels

The subjects of both of my posts thus far have been—at least indirectly—related to books; as it happens, they dealt with several attempts to adapt Tolkien’s work to the screen.  This post, on the other hand, is focused on a series of movies not based on a book.  Yes, I know the site’s tagline says, “thoughts on literature,” but “thoughts on literature, movies, radio plays, television, all other forms of storytelling, and the occasional thought on something else entirely” is a bit of a mouthful.

In any case, a new Star Wars movie premiered in theatres just recently.  Maybe I’ll watch it at some point, or maybe I won’t.  Either way, although the original Star Wars trilogy isn’t my favourite film series of all time, I do like it (the originals, of course—not the “special edition” abominations).  IV, V, and VI were all very well-made films; the characters, while not the most unique or original, were nonetheless well-shot, well-written, and well-defined.  The story structure—whether within a single instalment or across the arc of the trilogy—was solid and the plot was engaging.  Perhaps best of all were the actors who made all the characters memorable. Continue reading The True Horror of the Star Wars Prequels